Private Edward Ernest Clover

4 October 1916
Pte Edward Ernest Clover  s/no 7486 age 28
buried Struma Military Cemetery plot IV C 4

Edward was born in Leavenheath/Stoke by Nayland in the summer of 1888.  He was the 2nd of the 5 children, all sons, of Charles and Jessie Clover.  Charles was a corn miller who ran Leavenheath Mill.

Leavenheath Roll of Honour

Leavenheath Roll of Honour

There are 13 names on the Leavenheath Roll of Honour – and 3 of them are Clovers.  Having investigated, I discovered these are the 3 oldest sons of Charles and Jessie.   What a blow that must have been for his parents to lose 3 of their 5 children.

Charles Cecil Clover was born in the spring of 1887 and died of wounds on 10 May 1917 age 30.  He had been Acting Corporal, s/no 40161 with the Essex Regiment, and he’s buried at Etaples.

William Basil Clover was born in the spring on 1889 and died on 18 February 1917 age 27.  He was a private, s/no G/28949 with the Middlesex Regiment, and he’s buried at St Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen.

I haven’t been able to find Edward’s location in the 1911 census.  With a service number in the 7000s I would expect he had enlisted prior to the outbreak of war.  Even so, he was first deployed to France on 25 May 1915.  The CWGC website states he was ‘killed in action at Orljak Bridge’.  The war diary suggests that , throughout 3rd and 4th, some Companies advanced whilst others remained near the bridgehead – then vice versa.  Presumably time back at the bridgehead trenches was deemed a break away from the fighting.  Perhaps Clover was unlucky to be caught while he was resting.

The ‘headstone’ section, under each soldier’s entry in the CWGC website, shows an image of the ‘Headstone Schedule’.  This lists what was required to be carved on the headstone and the details that would appear in the final register, such as the names and locations of relatives.  We can compare the headstone schedule with the final stone.  I suspect the red markings are not corrections, merely clarification of the print of a fuzzy carbon copy – some of us remember those.

Edward Clover's entry from the CWGC website

Edward Clover’s entry from the CWGC website

Edward Clover's entry from the CWGC website

Edward Clover’s entry from the CWGC website

Ernest Clover's headstone

Ernest Clover’s headstone